Tag Archives: amazon

Advertisement and the Awkward Authoress

Marketing has never been my strong suit.  I always worry about where the line is between good marketing and being absolutely obnoxious. Typically I air on the side of caution and not get on my box with a megaphone and shout about my book like a sideshow barker, but on Sunday and Monday, my book was on sale for 99 cents and I went to town advertising.  I convinced my boyfriend/in-house artist to create an ad banner for me along with a new banner for my Facebook and Twitter pages.  I also paid $15 to have the Ereader News Today advertise it in their email newsletter and website.  From Sunday morning to mid-day Monday, I was hustling.  On both of my pages, I posted the advertisement banner along with a little message saying to please share the picture and spread the word, and guess what, people did! Continue reading

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Excitement, Pre-orders, and the Awkward Authoress

Live preorder

There isn’t much in life that gets me super excited, but the prospect of the second book in my historical fantasy/steampunk series being released in only a few months makes me squeal with anticipation.  Last night, after being asked by one of my followers on Goodreads when book two was being released, I decided to set it up on Amazon for Kindle pre-order.  The official release date for The Winter Garden (The Ingenious Mechanical Devices #2) is March 31st, 2015.  If you pre-order a copy of the ebook, it will automatically download onto your Kindle device on March 31st. You can order it here. Continue reading

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What’s In A Number?

Numbers… so many numbers swirl around my head on a daily basis and oddly all are about my writing.  It may seem odd to think of writing in terms of numbers, but with my first book published and the second well into production, it is often what my mind diverts to when I don’t feel like writing.  The urge check and analyze this data is often overwhelming, and part of what I hope to do this year is to not obsess about the data related to publishing. Continue reading

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The Importance of Being an Earnest Reviewer

five stars

Ah, book reviews.  The all too important yet dreaded rituals all authors dread.  Will they love it?  Will they hate it?  Will the reviewer absolute eviscerate me for seemingly no reason?

The thought of reviews for any author can be daunting, but to an indie author, reviews are one of the most important aspects of marketing our writing.  Currently, I am an unknown, a bit of krill in a ocean of whales and sharks.  Reviews are what often convince readers to take a chance on a newbie author, especially if they are more in depth than “OMG! IT WAS THE BEST BOOK EVER!”  Yes, I can convince my mom and ten of my friends to write puffy five star reviews, but does that do anything for me and what does that say about me as a writer? Continue reading

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Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell You’re an Indie Writer

books lined up

When you are an indie or self-published writer, you come across a strange phenomena.  Should you tell people you are not traditionally published unless they ask?

 

For several decades, self-publishing was referred to as “vanity publishing.”  Vanity publishing was when a writer would pay to have their books printed in limited runs, and they would then try to sell them.  The vanity aspect comes from the stereotype that self-published authors were people who were not good enough to be published by a major publishing house or were hipsters who were too good for the publishing world and wanted only limited copies of their books. 

 

Modern self-publishing is quite different.  Self-published authors are not under contract with a publishing house, but now, this is mainly because they choose not to be.  By self-publishing authors maintain all artistic control over their work from the cover, to the formatting of the book, to the content.  There is no interference from editors or agents telling them what to write next or what to stay away from.  Some writers do fit the stereotype and self-publish because they have been rejected repeatedly by the industry, but most authors choose it for the freedom and the profit margin, which is often better than what the major publishing houses are willing to give.

 

Sadly the stigma of self-publishing being an act of vanity still exists mainly because most people don’t realize how common self-publishing is with sites like Amazon, Lulu, or Lightning Source.  After publishing The Earl of Brass, I have found myself holding back when someone mentions the publishing process.  I’ll skate around it by nodding and saying that it was a lot of work and took a while to get ready.  When I have mentioned it was self-published, people who were enthusiastic suddenly deflate, as if the book lost its worth because it wasn’t chosen by a major publisher to be printed.  Because I am new to this phenomena, I am still unsure how to respond to it, but I think the best way is to have people read it, hopefully enjoy it, and then say it was self-published.  That way, they realize it wasn’t self-published because the quality was poor but because I wanted to do it that way.  As I explore my experiences in this endeavor, I will create blog posts about what the process was in publishing in paperback and ebook form and how I prep my books for publication.  If there is ever a topic anyone wants me to explore, just leave a comment or message, and I will try to write a hopefully helpful post.

The Earl of Brass is on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Smashwords, and Book Depository

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