Tag Archives: writers block

Take Chances, Make Mistakes, Get Messy

ms frizzle quote

I have found my motto for when I teach college freshmen in the fall and it comes from one of my childhood inspirations, Ms. Frizzle from The Magic School Bus.

One of the points we’re supposed to stress to the freshman is that writing should be done in multiple drafts and not in one giant Red Bull-fueled writing binge the night before it’s due. Why? Why does it matter that they hand in drafts instead of one “complete” paper?

A) That writing binge paper is probably shitty. I mean, have you ever read something you wrote at 2 AM?

B) Freshman need to be broken of bad habits they are taught in high school, like papers that focus on form over originality of thought

C) Drafts are a place to experiment, to find what you really want to say, and work on their craft. If they were playing baseball instead of writing, would you tell them that learning to catch the night before a game was adequate?

What I want my students to understand is that drafts in my class will be place for them to experiment with their writing and evolve. Those drafts will only be graded on their completion, but they’ll still be able to get feedback that will help them. The funny thing is, I found myself stumbling into the same trap as my future students.

I was working on a tough scene in Dead Magic and found that I was staring at my Word doc instead of actually writing. I knew what I wanted to have happen in that scene, but I was scared to write it. Putting it into a Word doc seemed so permanent. What if it was bad? What if it needed major rewrites? Fixing it on my Word doc would be such a hassle.

In my head, I knew it was a draft. I know that this version of Dead Magic is going to be overhauled several times before it ever hits Amazon, yet I still found myself staring at my computer as if it could never be changed. Luckily, I’m a stationary addict and already had a notebook I had hoped to use while at work or school to jot down ideas. Putting the laptop aside, I scribbled out the scene over the course of about two hours. It wasn’t perfect, it wasn’t neat or even that detailed, but it was written.

Step one: Write your stuff in a low-stakes place. Just get it out and try to keep going without too many stops.

Step two: Type it up and edit as you go.

For me, step two is par for the course. I’m not just going to slap up my shitty draft into the Word doc I was so paranoid about ruining. As I type up the new material, I add the detail that was missing in my handwritten draft and clean up any oddities. The low-stakes writing gets you out of the rut and can easily be translated into high-stakes writing. One of the unexpected perks was that I ended up writing more by hand and the word count grew even higher when I added detail while transcribing it.

If you’re getting performance anxiety working on your draft, try a change switching your medium. Writing in a designated notebook instead of Word may help take the edge of your perfectionism and help you get past your “writer’s block.”

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Sales, Interviews, and Updates

As the title says, we have some updates, an author interview, and a sale. All fun things, I think, for a Friday.

eob 99c promo

SALE

So, first off, The Earl of Brass, book one of the Ingenious Mechanical Devices is on sale for 99 cents from May 22nd (today) until May 26th (Tuesday) on Amazon. If you’re looking for a summer read to transport you to the deserts of Palestine or back to Victorian England, look no further. If you’re willing, please spread the word as well, especially if you know anyone who isn’t historical fantasy or steampunk/gaslight fantasy.

**Update** Spur of the moment, I decided to make The Winter Garden 99 cents as well from May 23rd (Saturday) until May 26th (Tuesday). If you want to pick up BOTH Ingenious Mechanical Devices books for less than $2, head over to Amazon.


AUTHOR INTERVIEW

Next item of business: I did an author interview with the lovely Steve Turnbull. Mr. Turnbull is a fellow steampunk author who writes the Maliha Anderson series. To find out more about Steve Turnbull, check out his website. The author interview was featured in his newsletter here. You can get to know a bit about my process, what projects are coming up, and what I’ve learned along the way. I must admit, I love doing author interviews. By being asked questions, I often find I learn more about myself and my writing process.


UPDATES

I am part of a Steampunk media bundle from the Steampunk World’s Fair on We Bundle. It’s filled with music and a couple books including a short story by yours truly. It’s a name your own price thing, so you can spend as much or as little as you’d like on the bundle. It’s quite a bit of music and reading for the price, so if you’re interested, check it out here.

For the past few weeks, I have felt so stuck in my writing. When I’m feeling stressed out or torn between school and my personal projects (aka my writing), the words don’t flow. Oddly, I also get the urge to write when I have a ton of work to do, but I think that’s just an avoidance tactic. It’s been really hard to get anything done and have been stuck on the same chapter for two weeks. FINALLY, I finished it.

At first, I was just happy and relieved that it’s finished, but then I realized that I had finished my schoolwork completely, didn’t have to worry about my reading at the Steampunk World’s Fair, AND I got my grades for the semester, both of which were very good. As soon as the stress is off, it’s like someone unclogged the dam. The words come flowing out, and suddenly, I’m writing again. I don’t quite have the writing bug like I do sometimes, but I feel a lot better. I don’t think I’ll make my goal of 3-4 chapters for the entirety of the month. At this point, I’ll be happy with 2 finished chapters.


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5 Tips for Beating Writers Block

Sorry for not blogging sooner, but I have been under the weather for the past week.  Today’s post will be about the dreaded writers block.

Writers block can be one of the most crippling experiences for a writer, and after experiencing a bout of this recently myself, I thought I would post a few tips that may help to get through it.

  1. Ask, “Would your characters actually do this?”  Sometimes being stuck is caused by something as simple as trying to force a scene. Step back for a minute and think about how the scene can be reworked. Is your character doing something out of character? This can be the bane of a plotter’s existence because they have their outline and want to stick to it, but at times, a character can be whispering to you that they don’t want to or wouldn’t do what you are intending them to do.
  2. Free write.  Is another story knocking at your brain but you’re 2/3 into another one and don’t want to give up on it or throw yourself into a new project? Take a few minutes to let the scene out. Save the file in a separate folder of scraps or future projects and let it go. You can always revisit it when you’re finished with your current project, but for now, it’s out of your brain and on paper for later.
  3. Make an outline. Sometimes you need to see it on paper to get going. It’s often a case of where have I come from and where am I going? Draw out what you have thus far and then where you know you have to go. Typically, I use a blank sheet of printer paper and a brightly colored pen to stimulate ideas and remove constraints (no idea why it works but it seems to). Don’t put the future points too close together, leave space to fill-in with ideas. What do your characters need to do and how do we get them there?
  4. Look for visual inspiration. You have ideas, you know what you need to do, but the spark just isn’t there. Try going onto sites like Pinterest or Tumblr and looking for pictures that have to do with your story. If it’s set in the Victorian era, look up historical photos or vintage clothing. Is there a celebrity who looks like your characters? Look them up. Throughout the writing process, I create a Pinterest board of inspiration and look to it when I’m feeling stuck or meh about my writing.
  5. Read. One of the best pieces of writing advice I have ever gotten is to read. Reading will not only stimulate ideas, but it will be a refresher for craft. How does the author get to the climax? How are the characters built with depth and how do we find out about them? Read authors who inspire you and see how they did it. Learn from the masters, and let their words power yours.

Hopefully this helps you in your writing. The block is often caused by stress or fatigue and not laziness on the author’s part, but when you feel stuck, try some of the tips mentioned above and see if they help get you through. If nothing else, go for a walk and clear your head.


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